There is a sweet smell that makes me drunk

when I find the body of a butcher

strung up by a vein

I knew not existed.

 

His mouth has had days of ebb and flow

of flies and deer tongues,

of black beetles

who part the light from his muddy eyes,

 

of salt in the air and the seizures

that happen daily outside cities.

His feet are raw, like lumps of steak.

His hair gleams with flowers of flesh and blood.

 

I think of all the days

he has hid his face from the world

trying to pry gods

from the stomachs of cows and pig,

 

the nights his skin creaked

at the edge

of a harbinger’s blade.

This I know –

 

the little bits of forgiveness that lie

dried into amber husks

that once flew around the air like hornets

still remain in the underbelly of his shop.

 

I want to go there,

gather them in my indigo-bruised arms

and burn them as my child is born.

I want to build with them, an axe

 

piece apart my life

so it may too burn

and keep me warm.

For that is the true emblem of hope,

 

as is a body, hatching itself in the trees,

a violence beyond the words of the creator

forever swaying to and from

one apocalypse to the next.

 

 

John Goodhue lives in Bellingham, Washington and is a student currently pursuing a BA in creative writing through Western Washington University. His poetry is forthcoming or has been published in burntdistrict, Jeopardy Magazine, Knockout Magazine, The Write Room, and OVS Magazine, among others.

Filed under: Poetry

JUMP TO TOP
SHARE THIS POST
Apologies, for this post the comments are closed.
THE AMPERSAND REVIEW

Please follow & like us :)

Facebook
Facebook
Google+
http://ampersandreview.com/2013/09/ecology-by-john-goodhue/">
SHARE

Follow & Share

Facebook
Facebook
Google+
http://ampersandreview.com/2013/09/ecology-by-john-goodhue/">
SHARE

About

The Ampersand Review is a project of Ampersand Books.

Editor-in-Chief: Jason Cook
Poetry Editor: Corey Zeller

Newsletter

Email address goes here
AMPERSAND REVIEW
x
menu
Facebook
Facebook
Google+
http://ampersandreview.com/2013/09/ecology-by-john-goodhue/">
SHARE